Product Management Assessment Tool

PM leaders, such as VPs or Director of Product Management, worry about the health of their teams and processes, not just the health of their products. (See my recent post on metrics.) There’s a shortage of tools to help us evaluate how well we’re doing as PM organizations. I created this simple assessment tool based on a diagram I’ve been using for several years. The diagram highlights three key relationships for a (tech) product manager: with Development, with Marketing/Sales/Customers, and with Executives. (This point of view is not unique. See, for instance, Pragmatic Marketing’s triad model.) This tool provides a few indicators as to whether we’re meeting our core obligations to these three groups. A fourth category pulls together indicators…

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Very simple customer savings/ROI template

One of the first things I ask about with a new product team is “how will a customer justify paying for your product?” An apparently simple question, but I often get blank stares.  Here’s a thumbnail of the problem and the process, along with a tiny spreadsheet template.

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Kindle version of “Art of Product Management”

Rich Mironov’s “Art of Product Management” has been converted to Amazon’s Kindle format, and is now available for download. Get the Kindle version here or the paper version here. From the original book summary: “The Art of Product Management takes us inside the head of a product management thought leader. With color and humor, Rich Mironov gives us a taste of Silicon Valley’s tireless pursuit of great technology and its creation of new products. He provides strategic advice to product managers and tech professionals about start-ups, big organizations, how to think like a customer, and what things should cost. He also reminds us to love our products and our teams. The Art of Product Management brings together the best insights…

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Sales-Friendly Price Lists

Price lists are never quite current enough, sufficiently detailed, or cover enough of the awkward special situations that customers raise.  So, there’s a tendency for HQ product and pricing folks to do a lot of tinkering on the margins with their price lists. We may be forgetting the “consumers” of price lists, though: sales reps who pay our salaries and customers wondering what to buy. Complicated pricing models may be self-defeating.

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The Strategic Secret Shopper

what are your competitors saying?

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