Reducing Risk Through Agile Product Planning (webinar)

What: “Reducing Risk through Agile Product Planning” webinar When:  June 2nd, 2010 Speaker: Rich Mironov, Principal, Mironov Consulting Replay the webinar here This webinar was part of Accept’s Agile Management Series, which also included speakers from Forrester and PRTM. Agile development teams focus on delivering products faster and with higher quality, reducing the risk of being “late to market.”  But product managers also worry about business risks including: building the wrong product, missing profitable segments, and constant roadmap changes.  How can we apply agile product planning to reduce our overall business risk? Reducing Risk through Agile Product Planning from Rich Mironov

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Forrester Podcast with Tom Grant

The Heretech is Tom Grant‘s blog for Forrester on technology product management.  His August 18th podcast with Rich Mironov covered a range of topics including agile and PM; product innovation and B2B products worth loving; where to look internally for good PM candidate; parenting as metaphor for product management; and dinosaur extinction theories. Tom’s light touch and literary allusions (“Dinosaurs in the Hands of an Angry God”) always make for good listening. Hear this podcast

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Product Camp NYC

We were thrilled that the P-Camp/Product Camp movement arrived in The Big Apple on July 18th, and that Rich Mironov was able to participate: What: Product Camp NYC Where: Down Town Association, 60 Pine Street, New York City 10005 When:  Saturday, July 18, 2009, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm Cost: Free, more information here Organized by: New York Product Management Association ProductCamps are collaborative, user organized professional conference, focused on Product Management and Marketing topics. At ProductCamp, everyone participates in some manner: presenting, leading a discussion, showcasing a best practice, or sharing their experiences. Others help with logistics, securing sponsorships, organizing sessions, or settng up/cleaning up.  This is a self-organizing collaborative event that is designed be a fun, rewarding and…

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Understanding the Opportunities of Buy-Side Economics

As CEOs of our products, we product managers have a lot to do.  Traditionally, this has included “build-versus-buy” decisions. The debate often hinged on whether technical tasks were “core” or just “context”.  Over the last decade, this has shifted from “build-versus-buy” to “buy-versus-buy” as we balance more kinds of internal and external resources.  Here are some thoughts on sizing various “buying” opportunities to keep products shipping and revenue flowing. The smallest opportunity might be called “the expert quick hitter”, then up to “niche technology provider” and finally a large “please build this for me.”  All three are invitations to think about what your team can do for itself, and your own urgency to get revenue products to market. Small: “The…

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Customer Input and Planning Horizons (Haas Executive Education)

Rich Mironov returned to the Haas School’s Product Management Executive Education series, “Product Management: Translating Market Opportunities into Profitability,” for a lecture on product management titled “Customer Input Approaches and the Product Planning Horizon”.  This session included an in-person version of the Innovation Game “Buy A Feature.” In a program primarily taught by Haas’ distinguished faculty,  Rich was (at the time) the only product management practitioner on the program’s teaching staff. Where: Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley, CA When: Tuesday, November 4, 2008 (the full program runs Nov 3 through 7) The Berkeley Center for Executive Development draws on the rich resources, talent and perspectives of top-level business educators and researchers from UC Berkeley’s Haas School of…

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Open Innovation: A Great Strategy Book

I’ve had the chance to read Henry Chesbrough’s new book, “Open Innovation: the New Imperative for Creating and Profiting from Technology.” It’s an insightful mix of practice and theory about how big technology companies are shifting their thinking about R&D — and the opportunities this creates for little companies.  Following are a synopsis, a brief author bio, and two lessons I found especially important for start-ups.  I hope you’ll buy a copy.

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